The Death Of Ellen Maria Allen

Although the Jack the Ripper murders occurred in the autumn of 1888, there were several deaths of women in the district that, when reading about them, do have certain similarities with the Whitechapel murders victims.

Indeed, there were several inquests that were remarkably similar in what was said about the victims to what would later be said about the likes of Emma Smith and Martha Tabram.

The East London Observer Saturday 11th September 1886:-

SUPPOSED DEATH PROM ILL-USAGE

On Wednesday morning, Mr. George Collier, deputy coroner for East Middlesex, held an inquest at the Weaver’s Arms Tavern, Baker’s-row, on the body of Ellen Maria Allen, aged 30, a widow and an unfortunate.

HER MOTHER’S TESTIMONY

Mary Ann White, the mother of the deceased, said that she saw the deceased on the 19th of June, at White’s Row, where she was living. She was then in her usual health.

On the 5th of August, the witness saw the deceased in the Whitechapel Infirmary, and she was then very bad.

Witness saw her several times up to Wednesday last, but she never complained of having met with any ill-usage. She was of very intemperate habits.

A view along Whites Row taken in January 2016.
White’s Row, January 2016

ALICE ELLISON’S EVIDENCE

Alice Ellison, deputy of a common lodging house, White’s-row, said that the deceased had been lodging with her for the last eighteen months.

A short time back she complained of being knocked about by a man whom she did not know.

The deceased was of very intemperate habits, and when she complained of being knocked about she was not sober.

The deceased was admitted to the infirmary on the 10th ult.

THE NURSE’S TESTIMONY

Laura Stacey, a nurse at the Whitechapel Infirmary, said that the deceased was admitted on the 10th ult., in a very destitute condition.

She was also very ill and she complained of pains in her side, which she said were caused by being ill-used. She died on Sunday last.

DR. WHITFIELD’S EVIDENCE

Dr. D. W. Whitfield, assistant medical officer at the infirmary, said that when the deceased was admitted, she was suffering from difficulty in breathing.

The deceased complained of ill usage.

He had made a post-mortem examination and he had found that the deceased had pleurisy, which possibly would be brought on by ill usage.

The cause of death was disease of the lungs, which might be produced by violence.

Her death was accelerated by drink.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.